CAMPAIGN TO END HORSE RACING SUBSIDIES

News

Protesters call on lawmakers to bet on education not horse racing in Yonkers

“We think it’s very devastating that our tax dollars are propping this up instead of helping New Yorkers in need…”

 

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Chad Brown, Horse Racing Trainer, Faces Domestic Violence Charge in New York

“Racing needs to boot out all unethical, violent abusers, and New Yorkers shouldn’t have to prop up the cruelty of this industry with $230 million in subsidies every year.”

 

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Don’t Let Belmont Bonds Become the Next New York Boondoggle

“After 10 years of subsidies, NYRA is no closer to self-sufficiency. Enough is enough.”

 

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More N.Y. horse racing participants convicted of illicit drugging in federal investigation

“The U.S. Department of Justice announced this week that a longtime New York standardbred trainer and a veterinarian both pleaded guilty to criminal charges in the largest horse racing drug investigation on record.”

 

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Ad campaign targets $230 million in horse racing subsidies

“According to the state Gaming Commission, so far this calendar year, 17 horses have died at New York state racetracks. In 2021, 106 died. That’s New York state tracks only.”

 

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Comptroller: NYRA doesn’t follow purchasing process

“New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli has released an audit on the New York Racing Association’s (NYRA) purchasing and procurement practices. The audit found that “NYRA does not adequately monitor and oversee its purchase and procurement process; consequently, sufficient competition is not fully promoted and possible overspending may have occurred.”

 

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N.Y. issues fewer horse racing drug violations than other states

“Alice Allen, who trained standardbred and thoroughbred horses in New York for decades and has testified before the state Legislature about issues in the industry, alleges New York regulators have intentionally concealed positive tests or declined to issue violations in some cases, to the benefit of high-profile trainers. She has claimed some horse racing participants who reported issues surrounding drug use to racing authorities have been ignored or faced retribution.”

 

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State comptroller: NYRA ‘spends money lavishly,’ flouts purchasing rules

“The New York Racing Association, a nonprofit that receives significant state subsidies to operate horse racing tracks, spent money “lavishly,” without adequate oversight and broke competitive bidding and other purchasing rules in recent years, according to an audit released Wednesday by the state comptroller’s office.”

 

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New York remains thoroughfare for horses trucked to Canadian slaughterhouse

“Government documents show that in the first two and a half months of 2020 — the most-recent period for which the USDA received records broken down by breed — Rotz’s Livestock shipped 350 equines to slaughter at Viande Richelieu, the only remaining Quebec horse slaughter facility. More than a third of those were listed as thoroughbreds or standardbreds.”

 

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State benefits for horse racing spark fierce fight in Legislature

“”At a moment when our working-class communities so desperately need funding for critical services like education, human services, and economic justice, to prop up a deadly industry that often abuses and neglects the horses in its care and is known for violations of workers’ rights, with $230 million of New York taxpayers’ dollars, is not right,” said state Sen. Robert Jackson, D-Manhattan. “This legislation will ensure that New York would not continue to waste money that should be invested in schools and other essential services.””

 

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‘Sopranos’ Actress Orders Hit On NY’s Horse Racing Subsidies

“New York’s $230 million in horse track subsidies are corporate welfare better spent on schools, Edie Falco and advocates said.”

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Report: Tioga Downs vendors schemed to dodge state contracting rules

“In two cases, Tioga Downs contractors participated in fraudulent arrangements to use minority- or women-owned businesses as pass-through entities for the product of other companies in order to give the appearance that the casino project was meeting state requirements about hiring diverse companies for contracts, according to the findings of New York Inspector General Lucy Lang.”

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How New York bankrolls horse racing with billions

“Horse racing in New York has been propped up by more than $2.9 billion in state taxpayer dollars and government-directed benefits since 2008, a Times Union investigation has uncovered. That’s more than twice the money New York budgeted for the state Department of Agriculture in the same time period, and 13 times what it spent on veterans’ services.”

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Editorial: Broken-down watchdog

Investigations by the Gaming Commission’s inspector general generated at least 15 reports on misconduct within the commission and two funds set up to support the state’s thoroughbred and standardbred breeders. The findings included conflicts of interest among fund leaders who benefited from state funding and programs, and commission employees engaging in prohibited gambling — sometimes on the job.

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State investigators struggle to catch cheaters in horse racing

“They found a substance labeled “bleeder” — believed to have performance-enhancing effects — next to another syringe. A second bottle in the office contained adrenaline. Another medication they found was from a company that wasn’t authorized to make animal drugs.”

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‘Confidential’ inspector general reports show nepotism, gambling at work, sexual misconduct at Gaming Commission

“Ferriero, as a state employee, played a key role in determining which horses could race and he had knowledge of state investigations into drug use at the tracks. He also sent thousands of text messages to a few horse racing participants while he was officiating; behavior that a New York inspector general identified as “extremely suspect.”

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An inspector general questioned a horse racing official’s fitness for his job. What happened next.

“In late 2018, a state investigation quietly uncovered a series of troubling findings about the performance of a top Gaming Commission official overseeing horse racing at the Saratoga Race Course, Aqueduct Racetrack and Belmont Park.”

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N.Y. lab losing battle of doping in horse racing’s ‘cat and mouse game’

“New York’s Equine Drug Testing and Research Laboratory is considered one of the most preeminent in the country, but its director, George Maylin, and his team acknowledge their lab can test for and identify only a portion of the substances found in the thousands of samples taken from New York racehorses every year.”

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Poll: Most New Yorkers say they never go to horse tracks

“The results showed 91 percent of respondents said they never go to New York tracks to bet on horse racing in a typical year. Five percent of respondents said they go once a year, 1 percent said they go twice and 3 percent said they go more than twice.”

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PETA and NYCLASS question NYRA on Bob Baffert and conflicts of interest

“PETA and NYCLASS are calling on the New York Racing Association (NYRA) today to explain how it will deal with conflicts of interest that may influence their decision on whether trainer Bob Baffert will be permanently banned from NYRA-operated tracks, given that at least four board members appear to have, or have had, business ties with the disgraced trainer.”

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PETA Survey Takes Aim at Horse Racing Subsidies

“The survey, asking the question “Do you think: The state should continue to direct casino revenues to support the horse racing industry? Or, should the state redirect these revenues to fund public services?” found 83% support.”

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Advocates want to bring an end to horse racing subsidies in N.Y.

“A coalition of groups, ranging from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals to the Alliance for Quality Education, want lawmakers to halt the financial perks enjoyed by the state’s thoroughbred racing industry, claiming the money would be better used for education, healthcare or human services.”

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